A Published Egyptian Flint Spearhead from the Thebaid, <br><em>Neolithic - Pre Dynastic Period, ca. 7500 - 3700 BCE</em>
A Published Egyptian Flint Spearhead from the Thebaid, <br><em>Neolithic - Pre Dynastic Period, ca. 7500 - 3700 BCE</em>
A Published Egyptian Flint Spearhead from the Thebaid, <br><em>Neolithic - Pre Dynastic Period, ca. 7500 - 3700 BCE</em>
A Published Egyptian Flint Spearhead from the Thebaid, <br><em>Neolithic - Pre Dynastic Period, ca. 7500 - 3700 BCE</em>

A Published Egyptian Flint Spearhead from the Thebaid,
Neolithic - Pre Dynastic Period, ca. 7500 - 3700 BCE

EX2205

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A very fine lower paleolithic petaloid blade of classic drop form, bifacially knapped with pressure-flaked, sharpened edges.

In Egypt, people usually made stone tools from chert, a siliceous rock with properties that allow the stone worker to control the way it breaks. Chert occurs both as pebbles and in rock outcrops. It is often possible to identify the exact outcrop that was the source of specific tools, and this can show how far from their campsites early groups went to collect suitable stone. Chert is broken by striking it with a pebble called a hammerstone; good hand–eye coordination is needed to strike the chert in the right place and with the right amount of force so that it fractures as the tool-maker wants. Levallois tools may look easy to make, but modern experimental replication shows that the technique is extremely difficult to achieve without many hours of practice.

Published: De Rustafjaell, R. (1914). The stone age in Egypt: a record of recently discovered implements and products of handicraft of the archaic Nilotic races inhabiting the Thebaid. New York: W.E. Rudge. p. 67 #875.

ConditionA very fine example that is intact and in excellent condition overall.  

Dimensions: Length: 2 3/8 inches (6 cm)

Provenance: Collection of Colonel Robert de Rustafjaell F.R.G.S. (1876-1943), acquired prior to 1909, purchased at one of the Rustafjaell sales held in 1906, 1913 and 1915 by Gustave Maurice Heckscher who then donated to the museum founded by his father; de-accessioned by Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, in 2012. Robert de Rustafjaell, aka Robert Fawcus-Smith, was a British collector and author who worked in Egypt as a geologist and mining engineer. After World War I, de Rustafjaell moved to the United States, where he lived under the name Col. Prince Roman Orbeliani.

With the original Rustafjaell collection sticker attached (875) and Heckscher Museum accession number (59.329.11) marked in black ink on the same side.

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